Carbon Sinks and Mangrove Forests

$3.00

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Description

Are all ecosystems created equally when it comes to carbon absorption? Investigate the impact of habitat destruction of key carbon sinks in this case study on mangrove forests. This resources ties together human impact, global warming, the carbon cycle, and ecology into one unique and engaging lesson!

 

This lesson, although intended as a part of an NGSS Storyline on mangrove forests, can be used as a standalone lesson on the following topics:

  • The carbon cycle
  • Global Warming
  • Carbon sinks
  • Carbon credits

 

Lesson Overview:

This lesson begins with a short background on the carbon cycle. Students are introduced to key terms and concepts and examine a model showing the stages of the cycle.

 

Next, teachers should give students time to watch a 10 minute video on the Mikoko Pamoja Mangrove Project in Kenya. Students may wish to pause the video as they answer the accompanying questions. After the video, students will examine a graph showing carbon storage in a variety of landscapes.

 

Finally, bring the group back together to discuss the learning from the video and to analyze and draw conclusions from the graph.

 

Who is this resource for?

This resource can be used by classroom teachers, tutors, and parents of students in grades 6-9. It comprehensively covers the topics mentioned, and provides opportunities for student responses which can be implemented in a whole group lesson or assigned for homework.

 

This lesson is a part of a NGSS storyline unit that addresses the question: What would happen if mangrove forests disappeared?

 

This resource was originally designed to be used to support the conservation and restoration efforts of the UAE’s rich mangrove forest ecosystems. It has since been modified for use around the world. As a result, two versions of this lesson are provided: one specific to the UAE and one general.

How Can I Use this Resource?

  • Emergency Sub Plans
  • An independent work station in a set of stations
  • Flipped Classroom pre-reading
  • Whole or small group opportunity to model and teach Close Reading strategies and annotation
  • Differentiation – Assign this reading as reteaching for students who have yet to show mastery.
  • Homework
  • Creation of Independent Work Packet for students who are not able to be present for direct instruction.
  • Extension activity for early finishers or for students who show a special interest in the topic
  • Use as a square on a Choice Board
  • Interactive Notebooks: Print 2 pages in one and cut apart. Glue mini pages into notebooks with room for annotations on the side
  • Interactive Notebooks: Print entire PDF as a mini booklet and add to notebooks using these simple instructions.

 

What’s Included?

  • Student Sheet PDF
  • Student Sheet Digital (Google Docs)
  • 9 Slide Guiding Presentation (Google Slides)

 

Purchase includes a printable PDF file in color. On page 2 of this resource you will find a link to a student friendly Google Doc version of this file. You will be able to copy this file and use it with Google Classroom or any other paperless initiative.

 

Please take a look at the preview file to see more of this resource.

 

MORE QUESTIONS?

Check out our Frequently Asked Questions or email me at laneyleeteaches@gmail.com.

NGSS STANDARDS COVERED BY THIS CARBON SINKS AND MANGROVE FORESTS :

NGSSMS-ESS3-5
Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century. Examples of factors include human activities (such as fossil fuel combustion, cement production, and agricultural activity) and natural processes (such as changes in incoming solar radiation or volcanic activity). Examples of evidence can include tables, graphs, and maps of global and regional temperatures, atmospheric levels of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, and the rates of human activities. Emphasis is on the major role that human activities play in causing the rise in global temperatures.

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